U.S. Nuclear Medicine Technologists Survey:
Frequently Asked Questions And Answers

WHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF THE U.S. NUCLEAR MEDICINE TECHNOLOGISTS SURVEY?

The purpose of the U.S. Nuclear Medicine Technologists (USNMT) survey is to test the feasibility of conducting a large scale study of certified nuclear medicine technologists who were first certified in nuclear medicine in 1980 or later to assess their work histories and radiation safety practices.

WHO IS PARTICIPATING IN THIS STUDY?

There are about 1,500 US certified nuclear medicine technologists, first certified in 1980 or later, who are being invited to participate in the feasibility survey. This includes active, retired, and former NMTs.

WHO IS SPONSORING THE US NUCLEAR MEDICINE TECHNOLOGISTS SURVEY AND WHO IS CONDUCTING IT?

The US Nuclear Medicine Technologist Survey is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Cancer Institute (NCI).

The survey is being conducted for the National Cancer Institute by the University of Minnesota, with support from Social & Scientific Systems, Inc., a research firm based in North Carolina and Maryland.

HOW WILL THE SURVEY DATA BE USED?

The information you provide on the survey will help us understand the number and types of procedures being performed by nuclear medicine technologists, personal protection practices, and how that information has changed over time. This information will be used to estimate radiation exposures related to working with nuclear medicine procedures.

WHY DO YOU NEED MY BADGE DOSE READINGS?

Badge dose readings provide the most accurate information about occupational radiation exposures and will enable the study team to estimate annual and cumulative doses for people who work with nuclear medicine procedures.

DO I HAVE TO ANSWER YOUR QUESTIONS?

You may refuse to answer any question at any time. Your participation in the Nuclear Medicine Technologist's Survey is completely voluntary and failure to answer any questions will not affect your future contacts with the University of Minnesota, the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists, the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board, or the National Cancer Institute.

WILL MY INFORMATION REMAIN CONFIDENTIAL?

Collection of this information is authorized by The Public Health Service Act of 1974. Please be assured that information you provide will be kept private under the Privacy Act and personally identifiable information will not be disclosed to anyone but the researchers conducting the study, except as otherwise required by law. Any published results from this survey will be reported in statistical summaries only and will never include a participant's name.

HOW CAN I GET STUDY RESULTS?

Summary findings will be provided through periodic newsletters or study updates and on this website. Abstracts from the published research articles will appear on this website. These articles are commonly available in university libraries and online through other medical library database resources, such as PUBMED.

WHAT IS THE NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE?

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which is one of 11 agencies that compose the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). The NCI was established under the National Cancer Institute Act of 1937 and is the Federal Government's principal agency for cancer research and training.

WHAT IS THE ROLE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA?

The study is being conducted by Bruce H. Alexander, PhD, at the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota, in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute, the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT), and the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB).

HOW DO I GET MORE INFORMATION OR CONTACT SOMEONE ABOUT THE STUDY?

You may contact the USNMT research staff at the University of Minnesota by telephone at (800) 477-6466 or by email at usnmt@umn.edu.